Alabama State Overview

Alabama general data

  • Time zone: 6 hours less than Italy
  • Capital: Montgomery
  • Main towns: Birmingham, Mobile, Huntsville, Tuscaloosa.
  • Area: 135.776 km²
  • Population: 4,800,000 inhabitants approximately.
  • Population density: 35,3 residents / km²
  • State abbreviation: AL
  • Entry into the United States: Joins the United States on December 14, 1819 and is the 22nd state to join the union.

According to thembaprograms.com, Alabama is located in the southern United States. Access to the sea is limited to 84 km of coastline, where it also hosts the only port in the city of Mobile. The average elevation of Alabama is 150m and the highest point is Mount Cheah, 734m, in the Appalachian Mountains, northeast of the state. With an area more or less equivalent to half of the Italian territory, Alabama has several natural regions: the eastern slopes of the Appalachian mountain range, form the Great Rift Valley, which occupies much of Alabama, the fertile clay strip, called the Black Belt, which extends along the central western part of the state, the coastal plain of the Gulf of Mexico. Alabama has an extensive hydrographic network, largely navigable. The main systems are the Tombidge, formed by the Coosa Tallapoosa and Alabama rivers, and the Mobile-Tensaw. The Tennessee and Chatahoochee Rivers also flow into Alabama. The state has no significant natural lakes, but dams built in the 1930s. 65% of the state is covered by forests (3% of this land is protected by the government), where mainly oaks, pines, magnolias, cypresses and walnuts grow. This enormous forest wealth has turned this resource into one of the pillars of the state’s economy.

Mineral resources in this state are mainly located in the center and north, especially in the Birmingham area, where there are coal and iron ore deposits. Major coal mines are found in Warrior, Cahaba and Coosa. There are also marble formations in Talladega and Coosa counties and commercially exploited oil deposits in Choctaw County in the southeast. Alabama is also rich in bauxite, manganese, mica, graphite, and clay. The state enjoys a temperate climate with average temperatures of 26 ° C in July (although it sometimes reaches 38 ° C) and 7 ° C in January. The average annual temperature is 18 ° C, although in the northern mountain counties the average annual temperature is lower than that of the coastal zone. The average annual rainfall of 1,420 mm, giving most of the rainfall in the Gulf region, and especially in the summer months (1650 mm). In the north and center of the state, rainfall occurs in spring and winter, and only occasionally in the form of snow in the northernmost area. In September, October and November, rainfall is scarce throughout the state. Given its geographic location, Alabama is exposed to hurricane action during the summer months. and especially in the summer months (1650 mm). In the north and center of the state, rainfall occurs in spring and winter, and only occasionally in the form of snow in the northernmost area. In September, October and November, rainfall is scarce throughout the state. Given its geographic location, Alabama is exposed to hurricane action during the summer months. and especially in the summer months (1650 mm). In the north and center of the state, rainfall occurs in spring and winter, and only occasionally in the form of snow in the northernmost area. In September, October and November, rainfall is scarce throughout the state. Given its geographic location, Alabama is exposed to hurricane action during the summer months.

Flora and fauna – The territory of Alabama is covered for more than two thirds by forests, consisting largely of southern yellow pines, red cedars, and other conifers. Among the deciduous trees we find the American walnut, the rubber tree and several species of oaks. The fauna is also numerous and varied, consisting of deer, foxes, bobcats and many types of birds.

Montgomery

Montgomery (Alabama), a city in the center of Alabama, the state capital. Port on the Alabama River, Montgomery is one of the most important markets for cotton and livestock, and a manufacturing center located in the rich agricultural region of the Black Belt. Major products in the area include, computer software, paper products, machinery, furniture, textiles, and food processing. Tourism, construction, government activity, and financial institutions are important to the city’s economy, such as the nearby Maxwell Air Force Base.

The city is famous for its fine colonial mansions and buildings, which include the State Capitol, which served as the capitol of the Confederacy during the early months of the American Civil War (1861-1865), the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, with exhibits of American art, and a museum dedicated to F. Scott Fitzgerald, located in the house once occupied by the writer.

The Civil Rights Memorial, designed by artist Maya Lin, honors 40 people who gave their lives between 1954 and 1968 in the struggle for racial equality. Montgomery is also home to the Shakespeare Alabama Festival, one of the largest in the world.

Montgomery’s fame is also linked to two of the greatest artistic exponents of the 20th century. Zelda Fitzgerald, born here, and her husband, writer F. Scott Fizgerald, lived there in 1931, around the time she wrote Tender is the Night. Their home has now become a museum. In 1958, country singer Hank Williams held his last concert here three days before he died. The remains of Williams, whose statue is displayed downtown, rest in the Oakwood Cemetery.

According to topschoolsoflaw.com, Montgomery was born from the merger of two settlements on the site of the present city (1819). Named after Richard Montgomery, general of the American Revolution (1775-1783). It became the state capital replacing the city of Tuscaloosa in 1846, and five years later, it was connected by rail to the surrounding areas. Alabama was among the first states to break away from the Union before the outbreak of the civil war. Southern States delegates met in Montgomery and established the Provisional Government of the Confederate States of America in February 1861. The city, known as the cradle of the Confederacy, was the Confederate capital between February and May 1861. Union took Montgomery in April 1865.

In 1956, the civil rights movement’s first major victory came after a year-long boycott of the city’s urban transport system by the black community. Led by local minister Martin Luther King, Jr., the boycott led to the disruption of the city’s transportation system, and its success significantly strengthened the civil rights movement.

Alabama State Overview